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Renovated 1950s property becomes spacious home

The original footprint of this 1950s house needed an update. A love of midcentury design steered the home owners and designer to work around a brief to to layer contemporary details and midcentury elements.

 

The original footprint of this 1950s house needed an update. A love of midcentury design steered the home owners and designer to work around a brief to to layer contemporary details and midcentury elements. Many original features were left untouched, such as the fireplace and built-ins.

The original brick facade was left untouched on the first level and cladding added to the upper level, to give the home a more contemporary feel.

When you enter the newly renovated home the first thing you notice is the custom divider that provides separation between the entrance hall and living area. The home owners wanted more privacy in the large open area, and building cupboards and a screen offered a level of privacy and provided extra storage. The birch veneered cabinets blend beautifully with the new laminate floors fitted throughout the home. Slats in the centre allow natural light to pass between the different rooms.

 

Built-in furniture was frequently used to divide rooms in mid-century homes, and this home already had the space to use open spaces to fit modern built-in that were both beautiful and practical. A modern wine bar fitted perfectly in an alcove next to the kitchen, but also conveniently located close to the living and dining rooms.

The wine bar is a hub for entertaining, with equal access from the kitchen and the dining room. A wall-mounted wine rack leaves countertop free for setting out appetizers or desserts when entertaining. The geometric wallpaper plays on a familiar modern shape and gives the niche an identity.

When manufacturing the kitchen cabinets, large central island, and other built-ins, care was taken to ensure that the grain of the veneer moved seamlessly across the surfaces. To tie in with the modern-midcentury renovation, all stainless steel appliances in the kitchen have a brushed steel finish. The extractor fan and adjacent cabinets were finished in brushed bronze to dress up the kitchen.

Rather than install a typical backsplash, the tiles were extended  to the ceiling and onto the floor. The stunning result delineates the kitchen from the rest of the open space. Open glass shelves along the rest of the wall get the most impact out of the tile.

Natural light from the double-volume atrium floods into the living room while mesh panels allow natural light to flow into other areas in the home. Modern doesn't have to be cold and lack personality if you incorporate comfortable furnishings (overstuffed but in streamlined shapes), textured rugs and fabrics, and wall-to-wall curtains to add softness.

Picture windows in the master bedroom let in a lot of light but made placing the bed a challenge. To solve the problem wall-to-wall curtains were hung to anchor the bed and offer privacy. A luxurious teal velvet quilt echoes the blues used throughout the house.

The bathroom receives plenty of natural light through the large window. This allowed for deeply toned tiles on walls and floor. To add interest the subway tiles were placed in a herringbone pattern.

A larger window was installed in the guest bedroom and this lets plenty of light into the previously dark room. To take advantage of more light, a touch of drama was added with start monochrome framed photos and mostly white bedding.

 

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